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Architecture-InsideOut

Exploring creative relationships between disability and architecture

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Why Architecture-InsideOut?

A huge group of people run, walk, wheel and slide down the Turbine Hall ramp

Architecture-InsideOut is an Arts Council funded project bringing together architects with disabled and Deaf artists to explore innovative new ways of designing buildings and spaces which improve the built environment for everyone.

Our mission is:

‘to promote activity that develops and captures models of new practice for the built environment, led by the creativity and experiences of disabled and Deaf artists’

We do this by:

  • enabling creative and constructive collaborations between disabled artists, architects, educators and related agencies

  • capturing, publicising and debating the best work so as to continually inform current and future practices.

  • developing the capacities of disabled artists, so as to make an impact on the built environment by improving the accessibility and quality of public spaces

Our Latest Project!

View from the bottom of the the wide and high flight of Duke of York steps

Architecture-InsideOut is currently involved in a major design proposal for an important London site. As part of the London Festival of Architecture (LFA) in July 2010, Matthew Lloyd Architects are developing a temporary proposal for making the famous steps accessible.

AIO is working on this proposal as part of a team with MLA, the Royal Engineers, Shape, LFA and RIBA London.

The prototype, which has been built and used during the London Festival of Architecture in July 2010, is a solar and water powered lift. Its main aim is to celebrate (rather than hide) improved access by designing a device that is enjoyable for everyone to use.

AIO Projects and People

2 artists and an architect sit on the floor together, discussing their collaborative one day design project at Tate Modern.

“Participating in Architecture-InsideOut has given me an opportunity to have a vibrant dialogue about the built environment with architects and other disabled artists.” Lynn Cox, artist

AIO aims to build contacts and networks. We host events and provide support for the development of architecture and disability projects, which are documented in Our Activities.

AIO Artists presents a gallery of the artists who regularly contribute to AIO's ever-widening scope of creative thought and expression, as well as working independently, in education, public and community arts, and on specific building projects. Through Related Projects, we want to promote the quality of work already done by disabled people and others, so as to encourage more dialogue and collaboration.

In Buildings We Like we showcase special and inspiring places chosen by architects and Deaf and disabled artists as examples of good design practice.

AIO is always looking to the future and welcomes your input and contributions. Keep up with our plans, add your comments and get involved by visiting Futures.

AIO News

AIO Director wins Go Public award!

Zoe Partington is one of three disabled artists to win an Arts Council arts commission.

Cabe scholarship report published

Zoe Partington has reently completed a CABE scholarship exploring acessibility in public spaces.

Going to the Beach?

Artists from AIO have been invited to work with Fluid architects on an accessible beach hut competition.

New projects for AIO

AIO are talking to both the Towner Gallery and the Turner Contemporary about possible collaborations.

Go Make! Residency at Fort Brockhurst, Gosport

Caroline Cardus, another AIO artist, recently completed a residency funded by DADA-South and English Heritage.

Dys-function@Liberty disability arts festival

Jon Adams, Arron Hormoz and Caroline Cardus came together as artists intent on subverting language and image at Liberty 2008

Artist Sarah Pickthall visits Beijing

AIO artist and consultant Sarah Pickthall recently flew to Beijing to sample the terrain at the Paralympic Games.


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